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The Trans-Arab Research Institute was incorporated in Massachusetts in 1998 as a non-profit educational organization. It was granted Tax Exemption under section 501 (c) (3) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986.

Recognizing that the Middle East is the most strategic area in the world today, and recognizing that it faces a number of destabilizing issues which can only be resolved on the basis of international law and justice, TARI aims to provide focused research and public venues to analyze, discuss and present optional perspectives on their solution. The various solutions proposed or being implemented in the area do not observe the two basic principles of law and justice. As such, the area will continue to be unstable and insecure for all interested local and international actors. TARI's goal is to scrutinize the causes and explore what policies will help promote stability with justice.

Specifically, TARI will provide scholarly studies relative to understanding the present social, cultural, economic and political issues confronting Middle Eastern societies as well as provide a venue for interactive meetings between Middle Eastern and international participants. To these ends, TARI will hold conferences, seminars and workshops to exchange ideas and present scholarly papers, as well as produce publications to share research and seminar results with the general public and specialists on the area.

Given its vision, TARI undertakes strategic interventions in public discourse about the Arab world in America and America in the Arab world.  The two extant examples of its seminal interventions in the USA are: the Right of Return Conference in 2000, and the One-State Solution Conference in 2009. 

On April 8, 2000, TARI held its first conference, "Right of Return: Palestinian Refugees and Prospects for a Durable Peace." The right of the refugees to return to their homes has been upheld by international law and UN resolutions. Israel has already announced that it intends to disregard international law (and hence, justice) in resolving the refugee crisis. Given the critical importance of this issue, which affects millions of people and the stability of the Middle East, TARI organized an international conference to consider all aspects of the Palestinian Right of Return.

On March 28-29, 2009, TARI held an international conference on One State for Palestine / Israel: A Country for all its citizens.  The conference provided a critical assessment of the current status of the two state solution to the Palestinian/Israeli conflict and explored the logic and feasibility of a one-state solution based on equal citizenship for Palestinians and Israelis.

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